Carl Higgs is a research data scientist in the Healthy Liveable Cities Lab of the Centre for Urban Research at RMIT University. With a background in computational statistics and spatial epidemiology, Carl has been involved in the development of methods for measurement of built environment exposures for local neighbourhoods using diverse data sources for research supporting equitable delivery of urban planning policy, in Australia and internationally. Research highlights include developing methods for calculation of a spatial Urban Liveability Index for residential addresses; scaling to a national analysis of Australian cities; contributing to the Australian Government's National Cities Performance Framework; development of a framework for visualisation of the spatial distribution of urban liveability, which formed the basis of the Australian Urban Observatory; and adapting these methods for use in diverse international contexts.

Publications

  • Higgs C, Badland H, Simons K, Knibbs LD, Giles-Corti B. The Urban Liveability Index: developing a policy-relevant urban liveability composite measure and evaluating associations with transport mode choice [Internet]. Vol. 18, International Journal of Health Geographics. 2019. p. 14. Available from: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12942-019-0178-8
  • Liu S, Higgs C, Arundel J, Boeing G, Cerdera N, Moctezuma D, et al. A Generalized Framework for Measuring Pedestrian Accessibility around the World Using Open Data. Geographical Analysis [Internet]. [cited 2021 May 20];n/a(n/a). Available from: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/gean.12290
  • Arundel J, Lowe M, Hooper P, Roberts R, Rozek J, Higgs C, et al. Creating liveable cities in Australia: Mapping urban policy implementation and evidence-based national liveability indicators. RMIT University; 2017. Available from: https://apo.org.au/node/113921
  • Alderton A, Higgs C, Davern M, Butterworth I, Correia J, Nitvimol K, et al. Measuring and monitoring liveability in a low-to-middle income country: a proof-of-concept for Bangkok, Thailand and lessons from an international partnership. Cities & Health [Internet]. 2020 Sep 7 [cited 2021 Apr 9];0(0):1–9. Available from: https://doi.org/10.1080/23748834.2020.1813537
  • Open referral policy within a nurse-led memory clinic: Patient demographics, assessment scores, and diagnostic profiles
  • Examining associations between area-level spatial measures of housing with selected health and wellbeing behaviours and outcomes in an urban context.
  • Using spatial measures to test a conceptual model of social infrastructure that supports health and wellbeing
  • The Urban Liveability Index: developing a policy-relevant urban liveability composite measure and evaluating associations with transport mode choice
  • From Ballarat to Bangkok: how can cross-sectoral partnerships around the Sustainable Development Goals accelerate urban liveability?
  • Liveability aspirations and realities: Implementation of urban policies designed to create healthy cities in Australia
  • What is the meaning of urban liveability for a city in a low-to-middle-income country? Contextualising liveability for Bangkok, Thailand
  • Measuring and monitoring liveability in a low-to-middle income country: a proof-of-concept for Bangkok, Thailand and lessons from an international partnership
  • A Generalized Framework for Measuring Pedestrian Accessibility around the World Using Open Data
  • A Generalized Framework for Measuring Pedestrian Accessibility around the World Using Open Data
  • Building Capacity in Monitoring Urban Liveability in Bangkok: Critical Success Factors and Reflections from a Multi-Sectoral, International Partnership
  • Cross-sectional evidence of the cardiometabolic health benefits of urban liveability in Australia
  • Achieving ‘Active’ 30 Minute Cities: How Feasible Is It to Reach Work within 30 Minutes Using Active Transport Modes?
  • Data to Decisions: Methods to Create Neighbourhood Built Environment Indicators Relevant for Early Childhood Development
  • Neighbourhood walkability and dietary attributes: effect modification by area-level socio-economic status

Carl Higgs's public data